Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/145306
Title: 对比新马华语口语中的语气词 = A Comparison of the Pragmatic Particles in Colloquial Singapore and Malaysia Mandarin
Authors: 许妙璘
KOH BEO LIN BELINDA
Keywords: 新加坡华语语气词, 马来西亚华语语气词, 新加坡英语语气词, 马来西亚英语语气词
Issue Date: 9-Apr-2018
Citation: 许妙璘, KOH BEO LIN BELINDA (2018-04-09). 对比新马华语口语中的语气词 = A Comparison of the Pragmatic Particles in Colloquial Singapore and Malaysia Mandarin. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Due to geographical proximity and shared history, Singapore and Malaysia appear to have many similar features in their colloquial English and Mandarin varieties, and people from both countries would be able to converse in these codes without a problem. However, the people outside of the Singapore-Malaysia region might find it difficult to understand, due to the the code-mixing, code-switching and the use of pragmatic particles in expression. Pragmatic particles, such as “ah”, “lah”, “lor”, “ma” and “leh, are mostly the result of contact between different languages in the same linguistic environment. These particles carry pragmatic information – such as the speaker’s attitude, emotions, intention, understanding or as a discourse marker– and do not affect the syntactic structure or truth conditions of an utterance. For people outside of the Singapore-Malaysia region, these pragmatic particles may seem to occur randomly as part of a “broken” form of language, but in fact, there are syntactic rules and limitations to them, and each pragmatic particle has its own semantic and pragmatic functions. In Malaysia, Chinese people makes up less than a quarter (23.3%) of the entire population, while majority of the population in Singapore is Chinese (74.5%). Different regions in Malaysia also have different dominant Chinese dialects, which is used in day-to-day interactions more than Mandarin – this is almost never the case in Singapore. Hence, the influences from other languages such as Malay, and dialects such as Cantonese, Hokkien, Hakka, Teochew, will be much greater, resulting in a more complex system of pragmatic particles. In this paper, we aim to explore the similarities and differences between the pragmatic particles in the colloquial Mandarin varieties in Singapore and Malaysia. The hypothesis is that Malaysia Colloquial Mandarin has a more complex system and usage of pragmatic particles, as shown in our findings, and this is because the linguistic environment in Malaysia is a lot more complicated than in Singapore. Due to geographical proximity and shared history, Singapore and Malaysia appear to have many similar features in their colloquial English and Mandarin varieties, and people from both countries would be able to converse in these codes without a problem. However, the people outside of the Singapore-Malaysia region might find it difficult to understand, due to the the code-mixing, code-switching and the use of pragmatic particles in expression. Pragmatic particles, such as “ah”, “lah”, “lor”, “ma” and “leh, are mostly the result of contact between different languages in the same linguistic environment. These particles carry pragmatic information – such as the speaker’s attitude, emotions, intention, understanding or as a discourse marker– and do not affect the syntactic structure or truth conditions of an utterance. For people outside of the Singapore-Malaysia region, these pragmatic particles may seem to occur randomly as part of a “broken” form of language, but in fact, there are syntactic rules and limitations to them, and each pragmatic particle has its own semantic and pragmatic functions. In Malaysia, Chinese people makes up less than a quarter (23.3%) of the entire population, while majority of the population in Singapore is Chinese (74.5%). Different regions in Malaysia also have different dominant Chinese dialects, which is used in day-to-day interactions more than Mandarin – this is almost never the case in Singapore. Hence, the influences from other languages such as Malay, and dialects such as Cantonese, Hokkien, Hakka, Teochew, will be much greater, resulting in a more complex system of pragmatic particles. In this paper, we aim to explore the similarities and differences between the pragmatic particles in the colloquial Mandarin varieties in Singapore and Malaysia. The hypothesis is that Malaysia Colloquial Mandarin has a more complex system and usage of pragmatic particles, as shown in our findings, and this is because the linguistic environment in Malaysia is a lot more complicated than in Singapore.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/145306
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses (Restricted)

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