Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/145305
Title: 新加坡店铺的语言景观 = The Linguistic Landscape of Shops in Singapore
Authors: 胡筱轩
FO SIU HEING JOLENE
Keywords: 新加坡店铺, 语言景观, 社会语言学, 7种不同种类的店铺
Issue Date: 9-Apr-2018
Citation: 胡筱轩, FO SIU HEING JOLENE (2018-04-09). 新加坡店铺的语言景观 = The Linguistic Landscape of Shops in Singapore. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: The Linguistic Landscape of Singapore is influenced by the local vibrant language background of what constitutes our society. Linguistic Landscape covers both government (top-down) and private (bottom-up) signs, and in this paper the focus is placed on private signs due to  Singapore’s context whereby the local government does not enforce restrictions on the naming of shops and shop owners have the freedom to decide their shop names. This paper draws upon data from first-hand fieldwork, exploring the display of shop names (provision shops, pawnshops, hardware shops, clinics, confectioneries, optical shops and salons) presented in Singapore’s neighbourhood centres. Subsequent to this, the relationship between language policies and linguistic landscape of neighbourhood shops was investigated. As the shops owners are not obliged and expected to follow the language policy when naming their shops, this paper seeks to find out the extent of the language policy’s influence on shop names. The relationship between the two is studied through areas such as the type of languages used on signboards (monolingual, bilingual or multilingual); type of Chinese characters (simplified or traditional); arrangement of Chinese characters (left to right or right to left) and translation of Chinese shop names (hanyu pinyin or dialect spelling). The findings of this paper can be split into two major categories: aspects where the language policy has influence over shops names and aspects where the language policy has no or little influence over shop names. The language policy has great influence over shops names in terms of bilingual signs and arrangement of Chinese shop names from left to right. However the language policy has no or little influence in aspects such as traditional Chinese characters and translation of Chinese shop names based on Romanised dialect spelling. This study argues that the linguistic landscape is a result of social factors’ influence such as the language policy, bilingualism and Speak Good Mandarin campaign, demographic structure, as well as ethnic and cultural identity construction. The Linguistic Landscape in Singapore’s shops suggests that shop owners value pragmatic and traditional values as top priority in creation of shop names. The Linguistic Landscape of Singapore is influenced by the local vibrant language background of what constitutes our society. Linguistic Landscape covers both government (top-down) and private (bottom-up) signs, and in this paper the focus is placed on private signs due to  Singapore’s context whereby the local government does not enforce restrictions on the naming of shops and shop owners have the freedom to decide their shop names. This paper draws upon data from first-hand fieldwork, exploring the display of shop names (provision shops, pawnshops, hardware shops, clinics, confectioneries, optical shops and salons) presented in Singapore’s neighbourhood centres. Subsequent to this, the relationship between language policies and linguistic landscape of neighbourhood shops was investigated. As the shops owners are not obliged and expected to follow the language policy when naming their shops, this paper seeks to find out the extent of the language policy’s influence on shop names. The relationship between the two is studied through areas such as the type of languages used on signboards (monolingual, bilingual or multilingual); type of Chinese characters (simplified or traditional); arrangement of Chinese characters (left to right or right to left) and translation of Chinese shop names (hanyu pinyin or dialect spelling). The findings of this paper can be split into two major categories: aspects where the language policy has influence over shops names and aspects where the language policy has no or little influence over shop names. The language policy has great influence over shops names in terms of bilingual signs and arrangement of Chinese shop names from left to right. However the language policy has no or little influence in aspects such as traditional Chinese characters and translation of Chinese shop names based on Romanised dialect spelling. This study argues that the linguistic landscape is a result of social factors’ influence such as the language policy, bilingualism and Speak Good Mandarin campaign, demographic structure, as well as ethnic and cultural identity construction. The Linguistic Landscape in Singapore’s shops suggests that shop owners value pragmatic and traditional values as top priority in creation of shop names.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/145305
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses (Restricted)

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