Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/145302
Title: 情场与战场—论五十年代香港《小说报》中的冷战叙事 = Romance and War: A Study of Cold War Narratives within “The Story Paper” in the 1950s
Authors: 卞和
BIAN HE
Keywords: 情场与战场, 五十年代冷战叙事, 台海的乡村谍战,  港澳的罪恶码头, 东南亚的校园隐患 
Issue Date: 9-Apr-2018
Citation: 卞和, BIAN HE (2018-04-09). 情场与战场—论五十年代香港《小说报》中的冷战叙事 = Romance and War: A Study of Cold War Narratives within “The Story Paper” in the 1950s. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Understanding Cultural Cold War in Asia has earned attention across many fields of studies, thereby affirming the importance of Hong Kong and Singapore as hot zones of competing ideological agendas driven by the superpower states. Consequently, in studying the negotiations between knowledge production and cultural propaganda, it has demanded much interest to be placed in highbrow publications. Yet, the field of Hong Kong ‘Pulp Culture’ during the 1950s has remained largely overlooked, while the industry was vested with US political ambitions, and developed a close publication network with Singapore and other Southeast Asian countries. “The Story Paper” funded in 1955 was the most prominent pulp publication in Hong Kong, with a distribution network across Taiwan, Hong Kong and Southeast Asia. Despite an appearance as an independent and private publication, the editor of “The Story Paper” had close ties with both the USIS (United States Information Service) and the Kuomintang administration. As a fortnightly periodical, “The Story Paper” provided mostly romantic fictions narrated under the context of Cold War for its diverse readership. While the writers consist new immigrants who had fled to Hong Kong after the establishment of a newly founded socialist regime in Mainland China. Consequently, the Cold War narratives reflected the negotiation amongst the popular writers, the editor and the inspection from USIS, as the publication functioned to serve discreetly in favor of US propaganda. It is therefore a medium from which Chinese readership across Hong Kong and Southeast Asia would develop a geopolitical imaginaire of Asia split between the ‘Free World’ and the “Totalitarian World’. Moreover, the romantic narratives also serve to assert a sentimental pedagogy upon the readers in reconstructing their sense of cultural identity. This paper examines the fictions published in “The Story Paper” in the 1950s, to analyze how its narratives seek to represent Cold War to its readership, as well as, the negotiation between covert propaganda and literary works written by popular writers. Understanding Cultural Cold War in Asia has earned attention across many fields of studies, thereby affirming the importance of Hong Kong and Singapore as hot zones of competing ideological agendas driven by the superpower states. Consequently, in studying the negotiations between knowledge production and cultural propaganda, it has demanded much interest to be placed in highbrow publications. Yet, the field of Hong Kong ‘Pulp Culture’ during the 1950s has remained largely overlooked, while the industry was vested with US political ambitions, and developed a close publication network with Singapore and other Southeast Asian countries. “The Story Paper” funded in 1955 was the most prominent pulp publication in Hong Kong, with a distribution network across Taiwan, Hong Kong and Southeast Asia. Despite an appearance as an independent and private publication, the editor of “The Story Paper” had close ties with both the USIS (United States Information Service) and the Kuomintang administration. As a fortnightly periodical, “The Story Paper” provided mostly romantic fictions narrated under the context of Cold War for its diverse readership. While the writers consist new immigrants who had fled to Hong Kong after the establishment of a newly founded socialist regime in Mainland China. Consequently, the Cold War narratives reflected the negotiation amongst the popular writers, the editor and the inspection from USIS, as the publication functioned to serve discreetly in favor of US propaganda. It is therefore a medium from which Chinese readership across Hong Kong and Southeast Asia would develop a geopolitical imaginaire of Asia split between the ‘Free World’ and the “Totalitarian World’. Moreover, the romantic narratives also serve to assert a sentimental pedagogy upon the readers in reconstructing their sense of cultural identity. This paper examines the fictions published in “The Story Paper” in the 1950s, to analyze how its narratives seek to represent Cold War to its readership, as well as, the negotiation between covert propaganda and literary works written by popular writers.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/145302
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses (Restricted)

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