Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/144893
Title: THE ALTERNATIVES AND THE CONSERVATIVES: AN EXAMINATION OF THE CONTRADICTIONS IN SINGAPORE’S TOURISM PROMOTION 1964 – 1980
Authors: TIMOTTY TAY JUN JIE
Issue Date: 23-Apr-2018
Citation: TIMOTTY TAY JUN JIE (2018-04-23). THE ALTERNATIVES AND THE CONSERVATIVES: AN EXAMINATION OF THE CONTRADICTIONS IN SINGAPORE’S TOURISM PROMOTION 1964 – 1980. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: The 1960s saw the rise of the Western alternative tourist—tourists who deviated from the norms of organised mainstream mass travel—at a time when Singapore was making a concerted effort in tourism promotion to the Western markets. Singapore received two main types of alternative tourists: the drifter and the American GI. Drifters grew in prominence worldwide. In the 1960s as more youths from the affluent West became disillusioned with Western society and sought adventure and fulfilment through extended travels through exotic areas on a low budget. During the Vietnam War, the United States rolled out an extensive overseas Rest and Recreation Programme for its troops that included Singapore as an approved destination. However, these alternative tourists were more susceptible to the rising trend of Western counterculture and had the propensity to dabble in vices such as narcotics. While Singapore promoted its tourism to the West, it made itself pervious to such negative influences. Furthermore, the Singapore government was enacting strict social policing to clamp down on vices and anti-social behaviour and frowned upon what it deemed to be nefarious influences from the West. This thesis seeks investigates this contradiction between the government’s intolerant stance on Western culture in the 1960s and the 1970s, and its eagerness to woo to the Western tourists who embodied these very ills that the government frowned upon. This thesis also examines Singapore’s reaction towards receiving such tourists and the government’s efforts in mitigating the cultural contamination.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/144893
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses

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