Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/144145
Title: THE EFFECT OF LANDSCAPE COMPOSITION AND CONFIGURATION ON THE LAND SURFACE TEMPERATURE: A CASE STUDY OF YANGON, MYANMAR
Authors: CHONG EN TING, GRACE
Keywords: Urban heat island, Land surface temperature, Landscape composition and configuration, Landscape metrics, Remote sensing, GIS
Issue Date: 2018
Citation: CHONG EN TING, GRACE (2018). THE EFFECT OF LANDSCAPE COMPOSITION AND CONFIGURATION ON THE LAND SURFACE TEMPERATURE: A CASE STUDY OF YANGON, MYANMAR. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Rapid urbanisation has led to serious ecological consequences due to the replacement of pervious surfaces with impervious surfaces. One such impact is the urban heat island (UHI) effect. Despite the vast amount of knowledge on the effect of composition of land cover features on land surface temperatures (LST), there are only a few studies that examined the relationship of land cover configuration on LST. These studies were conducted for developed cites in arid and sub-tropical climates. The relationship between configuration and LST in developing tropical countries has not been extensively studied. This paper investigates the effects of composition and configuration on LST in Yangon City, Myanmar, using linear regression and correlation analysis across 45 randomly selected 1km2 plots. WorldView-2 was used to derive land cover land use map and MODIS was used to estimate LST. A series of landscape metrics was used to quantify and describe the percentage cover, density, aggregation and shape complexity of land cover features in the study area. The results showed that composition explained more of the variation in LST than configuration. After accounting for composition, not all the configuration variables were significantly correlated to LST. The shape complexity of buildings and bare soil appeared to explain most of the variation in LST. The results suggest that balancing composition and optimising configuration can mitigate the UHI effect but balancing the composition should be priority. Findings of this paper provide insights on the influences of land cover on LST in tropical cities and may provide useful insights in adaptation and mitigation strategies.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/144145
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