Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/144138
Title: DECONSTRUCTING AND UNCOVERING THE PRO-ENVIRONMENTAL PURCHASING DECISION
Authors: Ang Hui Hao
Keywords: consumption, purchasing decision, pro-environmental purchasing, household electric appliances, energy efficiency, Singapore
Issue Date: 2018
Citation: Ang Hui Hao (2018). DECONSTRUCTING AND UNCOVERING THE PRO-ENVIRONMENTAL PURCHASING DECISION. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Household electric appliances (HEAs) are ubiquitous in the modern Singaporean household. Many households take them for granted, merely a tool to complete chores the fast-paced world we live in. Seemingly insignificant, in reality HEAs have a disproportionate environmental impact, recognised by Singapore’s government through the adoption of energy and water efficiency policies. Therefore, studying the consumption of these appliances can reveal the pro-environmental values and beliefs of the households in Singapore. Consumption is an everyday phenomena and a staple of modern living, with the action of purchasing constituting a major component. This thesis aims to deconstruct the purchasing decisions made by households when purchasing HEAs, to uncover the competing rationalities, and ascertain how environmental concerns were rationalised within the decision. This is in line with the prevailing conceptual and literature gap studying the concept of consumption of HEAs in Singapore, resulting from legislation to cover the “sale” component and studies on energy saving practices that cover the “use component, with the “purchasing” component yet to be conceptualised and analysed. This thesis analysed a total of 604 purchasing decisions for nine common HEAs made by households in Singapore. Data was collected using a mixed methods approach incorporating questionnaires and follow-up interviews with the main decision-maker of the household. Three forms of pro-environmental purchasing were included in this analysis, namely considering the direct environmental impact of the purchasing decision and subsequent consumption; maximising energy or water efficiency; and maximising lifespans. This thesis however concludes that households rarely consider direct environmental impacts and concerns. Furthermore, efficiency iv and lifespan maximisation are motivated by incentives to reduce future variable and replacement costs, and the subsequent consequence of reduced disposable incomes. Separately, lifespan maximisation is motivated by incentives to avoid inconvenience and hassle.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/144138
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses (Restricted)

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