Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/144111
Title: THE EFFECT OF THERMAL COMFORT ON THE SPORTING PERFORMANCE OF ATHLETES IN TROPICAL SINGAPORE
Authors: Lee Jinjia
Keywords: Biometeorology, Heat Stress in Sport, Thermal Adaptation, Tropical Thermal Comfort, Wet-Bulb Globe Temperature
Issue Date: 2016
Citation: Lee Jinjia (2016). THE EFFECT OF THERMAL COMFORT ON THE SPORTING PERFORMANCE OF ATHLETES IN TROPICAL SINGAPORE. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Despite growing progress in thermal comfort studies, most existing studies have been conducted in the temperate climates, while there has been relatively little research been done in the tropics. Although heat indices such as the Wet-Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT) are widely used to assess human thermal comfort, they have received heavy criticism for its inability to account for subjective thermal adaptations. Hence, their universal application may lead to the inaccurate prediction of heat stress and risk. In the current human biometeorology literature, studies that have been done on the effects of weather and climate on sports have mainly been conducted on individual cardiovascular sports and in the temperate regions. However, with different tropical and temperate meteorological conditions, subjective thermal adaptations of people would also differ a priori. Hence, this thesis aims to address the literature gap and contribute to the growing field of human biometeorology and thermal comfort studies by examining the applicability of thermal indices derived in the temperate regions towards the tropics; as well as investigating the effect of thermal comfort on the sporting performance of athletes in tropical Singapore. This research found that the varying subjective adaptations of the NUS handball players have enabled them to acclimatise to the local microclimatic conditions, hence decreasing their thermal discomfort and allowing them to perform to their optimal levels. Thus, this thesis argues that present heat indices such as WBGT are not applicable to the tropics, unless adjustments are made to account for the difference in subjective adaptations across different climatic zones. However, it does not reject the usefulness of WBGT when applied to sports as it provides basic and understandable guidelines for sports practitioners to gauge their susceptibility to heat stress.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/144111
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses

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