Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/143857
Title: THE MAKING OF ALTERNATIVE “GREEN” SUBJECTS: EXPLORING ENVIRONMENTAL ATTITUDES OF LAY INDIVIDUALS IN SINGAPORE
Authors: Leung Sin Yung
Keywords: environmental attitudes, environmental identities, alternative green subjects, developmental state, Singapore, Q-methodology
Issue Date: 2017
Citation: Leung Sin Yung (2017). THE MAKING OF ALTERNATIVE “GREEN” SUBJECTS: EXPLORING ENVIRONMENTAL ATTITUDES OF LAY INDIVIDUALS IN SINGAPORE. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: This thesis seeks to examine how environmental attitudes among lay individuals provide insights into the ways lay individuals conceptualise and mobilise their discursive constructions of the environment, and how these environmental attitudes shape the production of socio-natural spaces. It intends to respond to literature that recognises how multiple and fluid environmental identities (and thus, attitudes) are not just contingent upon time and space – as both external drivers and outcomes of social change (e.g. Shove, 2010) – but are also mediated by uneven power relations. By utilising a combination of factor analysis and semi-structured interviews within a Q-methodology to examine lay individuals’ discourses about the Cross Island Mass Rapid Transit Line (CRL), this thesis demonstrates how governing techniques by Singapore’s developmental state may have created a broad group of environmental subjects within alternative “green” (pro-environmental) subject positions. These “green” subjects hold “green” attitudes but prioritise the nation-state’s interests over that of the environment. Crucially, any opposition by lay individuals pose little resistance to the state’s developmental projects in which environment-development tensions are present, such as the CRL issue. This may reinforce the state’s pragmatic ideology and developmental standpoint, allowing the state to push forth developmental projects at the expense of the environment. Ultimately, these findings highlight the challenges that environmental civil society faces in convincing the Singapore state to preserve nature, and emphasise the value of examining alternative “green” subject positions to elucidate non-hegemonic views about the environment (e.g. Dowling, 2010, Hobson, 2013), so as to better understand the complex politics of knowledge and its resulting implications on nature-society relationships.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/143857
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses (Restricted)

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