Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/143837
Title: THERMAL (DIS)COMFORT EXPERIENCED FROM PEDESTRIAN MOVEMENTS ACROSS INDOOR, SEMI-OUTDOOR AND OUTDOOR SPACES IN SINGAPORE: A PILOT STUDY
Authors: HENG SU LI
Keywords: Pedestrian movement, thermal comfort, indoor, semi-outdoor and outdoor spaces, physical intensity
Issue Date: 2017
Citation: HENG SU LI (2017). THERMAL (DIS)COMFORT EXPERIENCED FROM PEDESTRIAN MOVEMENTS ACROSS INDOOR, SEMI-OUTDOOR AND OUTDOOR SPACES IN SINGAPORE: A PILOT STUDY. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Thermal comfort is studied within indoor, semi-outdoor and outdoor spaces because discomfort can affect health and work productivity adversely. However, thermal (dis)comfort experienced during movements across these spaces, which is ubiquitous to the city, is relatively unstudied. As pedestrianisation gains traction in Singapore, pedestrian thermal comfort across the cityscape become more pertinent. Thus, this pilot study investigates how pedestrian thermal comfort varies spatially, and how physical intensity of pedestrian travel affects thermal comfort. Over a 10-week period, I profiled six NUS students for both their objective and subjective pedestrian thermal comfort during traverses across UTown. Data were obtained using (i) a heat stress sensor, (ii) a fitness tracker, and (iii) a questionnaire survey. Measured objective data were used to derive thermal comfort indices like wet-bulb globe temperature (WBGT) and physiological equivalent temperature (PET). Further, interviews were conducted with the subjects to ascertain details on individual acclimatisation behaviour and adaptation strategies. Results show that (i) more than 50% of the microclimatic conditions in indoor, semi-outdoor, and outdoor space exceeded WBGT and PET heat stress thresholds and subjects were at “moderate” to “high” risk of heat stress from pedestrian movement, (ii) subjects were most comfortable with humidity exposure across all spaces, (iii) correlation results between microclimate sensation and WBGT varied across subjects and space and (iv.) individual heart rates were not significant in estimating and predicting PET for activities like pedestrian walking. Findings support that WBGT applies better to hot climates and outdoor thermal comfort, and less for hot, humid climates and indoor thermal comfort. Self-reported (subjective) thermal comfort also differed from measured (objective) thermal comfort because acclimatised individuals have different sensitivities and acceptance towards (dis)comfort. Finally, I suggest that future thermal comfort studies to understand thermal comfort in a space in relation to comfort experiences in other spaces.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/143837
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