Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/143836
Title: ISIS AND EMOTIONAL GEOPOLITICS: A FOUCAULDIAN AND FEMINIST APPROACH TO SINGAPOREAN YOUTHS’ NEGOTIATIONS OF DISCOURSES OF FEAR, GOVERNMENTALITY AND EVERYDAY SECURITIES
Authors: Lizaso Naomi Elle Balisi
Keywords: discourse, emotional geopolitics, everyday securities, feminist methodology, governmentality, global/local
Issue Date: 2017
Citation: Lizaso Naomi Elle Balisi (2017). ISIS AND EMOTIONAL GEOPOLITICS: A FOUCAULDIAN AND FEMINIST APPROACH TO SINGAPOREAN YOUTHS’ NEGOTIATIONS OF DISCOURSES OF FEAR, GOVERNMENTALITY AND EVERYDAY SECURITIES. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: The declaration of an Islamic caliphate by the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (also ISIS or the ‘Islamic State’) in 2014 and their jihadist campaign have revived ‘globalised fear’ metanarratives through ISIS-related news coverage and the group’s adept use of popular and social media. This thesis aims to fill the gaps in critical geopolitics by taking a poststructuralist Foucauldian and feminist approach—using emotional geopolitics to question how discourses of ‘globalised fear’ and its consequent governmentality strategies are embodied, negotiated and/or resisted by young people in their lived experiences of everyday securities in the Singapore context. Recognising that the personal is political, this thesis will first discuss the hegemonic ‘globalised fear’ discourse(s) in online social media news through discourse analysis and segues into ISIS-related discourses of fear circulating in Singapore. I argue that there has been a recent shift towards fear discourses that are cognisant of Singapore’s distinctive postcolonial context. Second, I explore how discourses of fear produce material effects and legitimise discursive governmentality strategies in securitising spaces and disciplining bodies. I contend that discourses of fear create ‘governable’ spaces and bodies in a bid to secure Singaporeans against ISIS-related terrorism threats. Informed by everyday securities, I examine how young people in Singapore resist and/or disrupt the material effects of discourse. By rescaling the global/local and/or geopolitical/everyday and rescaling security narratives through their lived experiences of everyday (in)securities, I make the case for young people’s geopolitical agency be recognised and their marginal position in geopolitical research be redressed. Singaporean youths interviewed proved that they were not merely subjects to state disciplining strategies nor discursive fear. The thesis concludes with reflections on future directions for feminist methodologies and possibilities for a more productive discussion on race and religion in Singapore.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/143836
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