Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/143835
Title: CORRELATION AND IMPACTS OF THE EL NIÑOSOUTHERN OSCILLATION (ENSO) IN SOUTHEAST ASIAN CAPITAL CITIES
Authors: RACHAEL NICOLE TAN
Keywords: El Niño-Southern Oscillation, Southeast Asia, Correlation, Impacts, Floods, Droughts
Issue Date: 2017
Citation: RACHAEL NICOLE TAN (2017). CORRELATION AND IMPACTS OF THE EL NIÑOSOUTHERN OSCILLATION (ENSO) IN SOUTHEAST ASIAN CAPITAL CITIES. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Southeast Asia is a region highly vulnerable to climate variability like the El- Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Being able to understand the relationship between this phenomenon with temperature and precipitation will become increasingly important as climate change may increase the frequency of extreme ENSO events. As such, this thesis investigates the correlation between ENSO with temperature and precipitation in Bandar Seri Begawan, Bangkok, Jakarta, Kuala Lumpur, and Singapore. The impacts of ENSO were also studied across these cities to compare how impacts differed spatially using the Factiva news database, and if the impacts and correlations visible temporal lags. For correlations, results showed that most cities had positive correlations between the Niño 3.4 index and temperatures that lagged three months behind. Correlations between the multivariate ENSO index and temperatures were much weaker, suggesting longer time lags were needed. In general, correlations with precipitation were more inconsistent, likely because of different seasonal patterns. However, La Niña conditions did result in heavier rainfall and flooding in the lower equatorial cities of Singapore, Kuala Lumpur, and Bandar Seri Begawan. The Factiva search for ENSO impacts revealed that El Niño-related impacts are much more prevalent and visible than La Niñarelated impacts. These are likely because droughts, associated with El Niño, produce more prominent secondary impacts like the haze, have a more large-scale effect and are generally harder to mitigate than La Niña-related floods.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/143835
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses (Restricted)

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