Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/143831
Title: SPATIAL VARIATION OF HEAT INDEX FROM CENTRAL TO SOUTHERN SINGAPORE
Authors: JOYCE HSIEH JIA YING
Keywords: heat index, temperature, humidity, Singapore, tropical urban climate
Issue Date: 2017
Citation: JOYCE HSIEH JIA YING (2017). SPATIAL VARIATION OF HEAT INDEX FROM CENTRAL TO SOUTHERN SINGAPORE. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: This thesis aims to analyse the spatial variation of heat index from central to southern Singapore. The present study seeks to address the paucity of research on the heat index in Singapore where the heat index allows for the determination of apparent temperature when taking humidity into account. Humidity is often not as widely accounted for in terms of determining the heat stress of a population, and has never been studied explicitly in combination with temperature in Singapore. Singapore is characterised by a climate with high humidities and an ageing population with increasing inability to thermoregulate effectively, hence it is especially pertinent that humidity is accounted for in Singapore. To study the spatial variation of heat index, automobile traverses were conducted from 1:00 a.m. to approximately 2.30 a.m. on 15 nights to collect temperature and relative humidity data along the traverse route. The route passes through a range of land use types including compact high-rise, compact low-rise, scattered trees and dense trees. Comparisons are made between heat index and its related parameters (temperature, relative humidity, absolute humidity) at individual study sites along the route to identify factors that affect each parameter and relationships between them. The traverses yielded some unexpected results. Serangoon, a compact lowrise site, has the highest average heat index of 34.29°C, which is likely due to the presence of more anthropogenic heat sources at the site. Contrastingly, the rural, dense trees site at Old Upper Thomson, as expected, has the lowest average heat index of 27.08°C. Heat index temperatures are found to be higher than actual air temperatures measured at all study sites. The relative maximum differences in heat index and temperature between rural and urban sites are also more than double. Lastly, heat index thresholds from other countries are found to be largely inapplicable in Singapore.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/143831
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