Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/143826
Title: GEOGRAPHIES OF EXCLUSION: THE LIVED REALITIES OF PRACTICING VEGANISM IN SINGAPORE
Authors: Tan Shu Lin
Keywords: Veganism, exclusion, ethical consumerism, moral consumption, spaces, civilizing agencies
Issue Date: 2017
Citation: Tan Shu Lin (2017). GEOGRAPHIES OF EXCLUSION: THE LIVED REALITIES OF PRACTICING VEGANISM IN SINGAPORE. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Veganism is an individual and social practice that represents a new form of sustainable consumerism. Vegans make consumption choices that consider the environmental, ethical and social issues. However, such practices and lifestyles challenge the familiar standards of consumption resulting in the perception of vegans as socially different. This thesis illustrates how vegan consumers experience sociospatial exclusions at public and private dining spaces in Singapore, and how they as individuals, negotiate their identities in an attempt to integrate back into the society. Social (dining) spaces are shaped by the hegemonic ideals and cultural consumption of meat through formal (such as healthcare sector, religion, media, advertisements) and informal civilizing agencies (such as friends, family) who (re)produce and (re)affirm the norms of consuming animal products. Each civilizing agency has a different claim over a certain space, and they have different influences in validating hegemonic ideals and challenging it. Such power relations and cultural practices create and/or act as social and spatial exclusionary/inclusionary mechanisms that vegans have to negotiate with to perform their identity. The main factor of exclusion of vegans at the home and public dining spaces are the lack of availability of vegan food and social pressure. Vegan consumers may face different exclusionary/inclusionary experiences depending on their demographics and body images. The difference in subjectivities and motivation towards the vegan lifestyle will affect the mode of negotiation that vegans take, which leads to the (re)production of their marginality or the creation of a more inclusive environment. The negative responses received by the majority of the respondents showed a lack of societal support for veganism and a heightened need to increase the social competence of such lifestyles so as to improve the everyday experience of vegan consumers.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/143826
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses (Restricted)

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