Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/143710
Title: THE CASE OF THE CROSS ISLAND LINE: SPACES OF ENGAGEMENT, ENGAGEMENT OF SPACES
Authors: Tan Hui Zhen
Keywords: Cross Island Line, nature conservation, spaces of engagement, associational
Issue Date: 2015
Citation: Tan Hui Zhen (2015). THE CASE OF THE CROSS ISLAND LINE: SPACES OF ENGAGEMENT, ENGAGEMENT OF SPACES. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Nature conservation is a ubiquitous struggle in Singapore given that developmental projects are often prioritised highly in the national agenda by recourse to a leitmotif of survivalism and pragmatism. Accounts of nature conservation tussles are often replete with asymmetrical power relations between environmental non-governmental organizations like Nature Society (Singapore) (NSS) and the dominant developmental state that hold requisite territorial power over land uses. Nevertheless, the prominent role of NSS in championing conservation efforts has diminished alongside a distinct growth in environmental civil society and activism over the last decade. In January 2013, the Land Transport Authority announced bold plans to construct a new 50km Cross Island Line (CRL) that cuts through Central Catchment Nature Reserve despite its legal protected status. The proposal drew critical responses from both environmentalist groups and members of the public; and invoked a concerted nature advocacy effort in what is the first since Chek Jawa. Adopting Cox’s (1998) conceptual ideas of spaces of engagement, this study analyses the organization of environmental activism in response to CRL and seeks to illustrate how associational forms of power from Allen’s (2003) work help environmentalists negotiate strategically vis-à-vis a dominant developmental state; through three forms of engagement identified during field observations- 1) Networked engagement, 2) ii Grounded engagement and 3) Dispersed popular engagement. Concomitantly, it examines the effectiveness of nature guides as agents in engaging the public to create spaces of engagement. This thesis concludes that the conceptual lenses of Cox’s (1998) and Allen’s (2003) theoretical work can illuminate dynamic micro-level processes in Singapore’s environmental politics and highlights how emerging spaces of engagement in CCNR can also foreclose the engagement of other spaces. Ultimately nature conservation interests have to spaces of engagements are negotiated within and across spaces
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/143710
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses (Restricted)

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