Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/143689
Title: MORE THAN A MOMENT OF DARKNESS? A GEOGRAPHICAL STUDY OF DIALOGUE IN THE DARK (SINGAPORE) AND ITS TRANSFORMATIVE POTENTIAL
Authors: Joel Koh Jun Kai
Keywords: Dialogue in the Dark, Visual impairment, Activism, Embodiment, everyday, time-space geography.
Issue Date: 2015
Citation: Joel Koh Jun Kai (2015). MORE THAN A MOMENT OF DARKNESS? A GEOGRAPHICAL STUDY OF DIALOGUE IN THE DARK (SINGAPORE) AND ITS TRANSFORMATIVE POTENTIAL. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Dialogue in the Dark (DiD) is an exhibition where participants spend a moment in darkness, going through simulated everyday scenarios to understand what it is like to be visually impaired. Given the context of the everyday spatial exclusions which the visually impaired face, DiD aims to work towards an inclusive society through mutual dialogue. This thesis uses a serial interview method, to explore the transformative potential of DiD for participants as well as its activist effects beyond its time-space. I argue that embodied experience attained from DiD is transformative for participants, in terms of their perceptions and practices, resulting in their practice of everyday activisms beyond the time-space of DiD. Firstly, I look to the embodied experiences of participants in their engagement within the space of DiD. I use ideas of embodiment to understand their experiences and encounters in the moment of darkness, within the specific time-space of DiD. Secondly, I study the transformative impacts of the moment of darkness participants experience, on their perceptions and everyday practices. Thirdly, I demonstrate how such a transformation in the participants, result in certain small actions taken within their everyday. I use everyday activism as a means to make sense of such actions, showing how DiD has activist effects beyond its time-space. This thesis speaks back to existing literature in two ways. Firstly, I show how embodiment, usually used to make sense of the experiences of the disabled, can be used to understand the shifting temporal embodiment of a sighted person entering DiD as well. Secondly, I show how individuals who do not embody the disadvantage, such as the visually able, can be activists through enacting everyday activisms, in working to contest the ableist exclusion of space, even if they do not claim the activist identity.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/143689
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses (Restricted)

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