Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/143688
Title: CARBON DIOXIDE PARTIAL PRESSURE (pCO2) IN TROPICAL INLAND WATERS: A CASE STUDY OF THE SERANGOON RIVER-RESERVOIR SYSTEM (SRRS) IN SINGAPORE
Authors: Jharyathri Thiagarajah
Keywords: Inland waters, tropical environment, pCO2, river-dominated estuary, Serangoon river-reservoir system (SRRS), reservoirs.
Issue Date: 2015
Citation: Jharyathri Thiagarajah (2015). CARBON DIOXIDE PARTIAL PRESSURE (pCO2) IN TROPICAL INLAND WATERS: A CASE STUDY OF THE SERANGOON RIVER-RESERVOIR SYSTEM (SRRS) IN SINGAPORE. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Inland water systems have traditionally received less attention as compared to their marine counterparts. However accruing evidence suggests that inland waters are net sources of carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere. The potential of CO2 emissions can be expressed by the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2), and it is representative of the intensity of gas exchange at the water-air interface. When surface water pCO2 exceeds atmospheric pCO2, CO2 outgassing occurs and the inland water system is a CO2 source. With high temperatures and suitable environmental conditions that kinetically encourage CO2 producing metabolic reactions, the tropical region is considered a CO2 outgassing hotspot. This thesis attempts to quantify and investigate pCO2 levels in inland waters in Singapore. The objectives of this study were (1) to examine and investigate downstream and seasonal variations in riverine pCO2 in the Serangoon River-Reservoir System (SRRS) and (2) to investigate the potential of inland water systems in Singapore as a net source or sink of CO2 to the atmosphere through a baseline assessment of riverine and reservoir pCO2. Using the CO2SYS program to indirectly measure pCO2, results from the six-month study at the SRRS showed that the upper and middle reaches had pCO2 levels higher than the atmospheric CO2 equilibrium and were net sources of CO2 to the atmosphere, particularly due to anthropogenic disturbances upstream, while the lower reaches were net sinks of CO2. This observed downstream gradient in pCO2 was found to be typical of river-dominated estuarine systems. Results from sampling twelve reservoirs showed that seven had pCO2 levels higher than atmospheric pCO2 levels. As such, urban inland water systems in Singapore, despite their relatively small surface area, can be strong net sources of carbon to the atmosphere. This re-emphasizing the role of small inland waters as active conduits of carbon.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/143688
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses (Restricted)

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