Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/142764
Title: A ROLE FOR GLUTAMATERGIC TRANSMISSION IN MEDIAL SEPTUM IN MEDIATION OF THETA WAVE ACTIVITY AND AVERSIVE BEHAVIOUR
Authors: KHAIRUNISA BTE MOHAMAD IBRAHIM
Keywords: Medial Septum, Glutamatergic, NBQX, Hippocampus, Theta wave, Aversive Behaviour,
Issue Date: 19-Jan-2018
Citation: KHAIRUNISA BTE MOHAMAD IBRAHIM (2018-01-19). A ROLE FOR GLUTAMATERGIC TRANSMISSION IN MEDIAL SEPTUM IN MEDIATION OF THETA WAVE ACTIVITY AND AVERSIVE BEHAVIOUR. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: The current thesis explores the role of the intraseptal glutamate AMPA (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid) receptor in medial septum (MS) in modulation of theta generation and the mediation of aversive and non-aversive behaviours that are accompanied by theta wave activity. In all experiments, the function of the AMPA receptor was perturbed using 2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoyl-benzo[f]quinoxaline-2,3-dione (NBQX), an antagonist at the receptor. In anaesthetised and open field experiments, NBQX (of varied concentration) showed a ‘floor-effect’ on theta frequency with little or no effect on other electrophysiological changes, suggesting that AMPA receptor-mediated intraseptal glutamatergic mechanisms play a small but significant role in generation of theta rhythm under both pharmacological and physiological conditions. The same ‘floor-effect’ was observed in formalin-induced theta frequency, independent of NBQX concentration. However, a concentration-dependent effect of NBQX was observed with nociceptive behaviours. This strengthens the idea that neuronal network(s) in medial septum that mediate acute nociception and theta rhythm are functionally separate.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/142764
Appears in Collections:Ph.D Theses (Restricted)

Show full item record
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormatAccess SettingsVersion 
KhairunisaBteMohamadIbrahim.pdf5.71 MBAdobe PDF

RESTRICTED

NoneLog In

Page view(s)

8
checked on Jul 26, 2018

Google ScholarTM

Check


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.