Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/14214
Title: Surface modification of biodegradable polymer films for liver cell growth
Authors: HIDENORI NISHIOKA
Keywords: surface modification, biodegradable polymer, PLGA, cell adhesive peptide, hepatocyte, cell-substrate interaction
Issue Date: 1-Sep-2004
Source: HIDENORI NISHIOKA (2004-09-01). Surface modification of biodegradable polymer films for liver cell growth. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Many kinds of biodegradable polymers have been developed to fabricate scaffolds for cell growth. However, the use of synthetic polymeric substrates often causes insufficient cell growth due to the lack of biocompatibility. Generally, cell adhesion is mediated by cell adhesive molecules on the substrate surfaces. In this research, biodegradable thin films were fabricated from poly (D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) as hepatocyte culture substrates. The PLGA film surfaces were treated with acid or base to hydrolyze the ester bonds, and subsequently coupled with cell adhesive peptides, GRGDS, using carbodiimide coupling reagents. Cell culture studies with a hepatocyte cell line, Hep3B, showed an enhanced cell adhesion on the GRGDS-modified films. Moreover, cell functions, such as albumin secretion and cytochrome P450 activity, were significantly improved as compared to the unmodified films. Surface modification with cell adhesive peptides is one of the most useful methods to improve biocompatibility of polymeric materials for liver cell growth.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/14214
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