Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/13875
Title: Development of novel microbraided scaffolds for nerve tissue engineering
Authors: T B BINI
Keywords: peripheral nerve regeneration, microbraided conduits, PLGA, microfiber, nanofiber
Issue Date: 6-May-2004
Source: T B BINI (2004-05-06). Development of novel microbraided scaffolds for nerve tissue engineering. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: AbstractAdvancement in research about the construction of a nerve guide conduit tries to bring out the most beneficial outcome in nerve regeneration. Nerve injuries complicate successful rehabilitation, because mature neurons do not replicate, however axon extensions can regenerate over gaps caused by injury. The standard clinical solution to nerve injuries is by grafting. Attention has long been directed at alternatives to autografting using artificial synthetic nerve guidance channels. In the present research, microbraided and nanofibrous poly(l-lactide-co-glycolide) conduits for peripheral nerve regeneration and living C17.2 nerve stem cell a?? polymer constructs for tissue engineering of the central nervous system were developed. Polymeric biodegradable PLGA fibers were microbraided around a Teflon mandrel to make it as a tubular construct. Another attempt was made to electrospin poly(l-lactide-co-glycolide) biodegradable polymer nanofibers. In this process the polymer fluid was subjected to a high electric field that forms polymer fibers with diameters down to the nanometer range. The nanofibers were collected on to a rotating Teflon mandrel and fabricated to tubes or conduits. The fabricated conduits were investigated to function as nerve guidance channels. The conduits were also studied for their surface morphology, swelling behaviour, degradation and biocompatibility. The surface morphology was analysed by scanning electron microscope, swelling behaviour by weight increase due to water uptake and biocompatibility by in vitro cytotoxicity assessment in terms of cell morphology and cell viability by MTT assay of polymer extract treated cells. Degradation tests were carried out and the micrographs of the conduit showed that the degradation of the PLGA conduit is by bulk hydrolysis of the polymer. The feasibility of in vivo nerve regeneration was investigated through several of these conduits. Biological performances of the conduits were examined in the rat sciatic nerve model. None of the implanted tubes showed tube breakage. The NGCs were flexible, permeable and showed no swelling apart from its other advantages. The feasibility of PLGA polymer as scaffolds for tissue engineering of the central nervous system with different structures was also investigated. C17.2 nerve stem cells that were cultured on the different scaffolds adhered and differentiated well on all the scaffolds and supported neurite outgrowth.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/13875
Appears in Collections:Ph.D Theses (Open)

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02_Acknowledgement.PDF19.83 kBAdobe PDF

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03_Preamble.PDF22.35 kBAdobe PDF

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04_Contents.PDF30.17 kBAdobe PDF

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05_List_of_figures,_table,_abbreviations.PDF45.97 kBAdobe PDF

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06_Summary.PDF23.32 kBAdobe PDF

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