Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/136743
Title: MEMBRANE TECHNOLOGY FOR OSMOTIC POWER GENERATION BY PRESSURE RETARDED OSMOSIS (PRO)
Authors: WAN CHUNFENG
Keywords: Pressure retarded osmosis, osmotic power, hollow fiber membrane, membrane module, desalination
Issue Date: 3-Jan-2017
Source: WAN CHUNFENG (2017-01-03). MEMBRANE TECHNOLOGY FOR OSMOTIC POWER GENERATION BY PRESSURE RETARDED OSMOSIS (PRO). ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Osmotic energy is a great source of clean and sustainable energy. Pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) is the most efficient and most investigated technology to convert the osmotic energy to useful works. However, fresh water is scarce in Singapore. In this PhD work, the high-salinity reverse osmosis (RO) brine and wastewater reject are used in PRO for the first time. Robust TFC hollow fiber membrane with high power density is developed for this application. It can generate a power density of 27 W/m^2 at 20 bar, using artificial RO brine and DI water as the feed pair. The hollow fiber membranes are further assembled into structured pilot scale membrane modules and tested on a pilot system. Use of RO brine as the draw solution promotes the potential integration of RO and PRO. A model that evaluates the membrane PRO performance and system energy consumption is developed. It is projected that 25.6-40.7 million kWh/day of energy can be recovered globally, if all brines can be recycled as the draw solution in PRO. The model concludes that integration of SWRO with PRO will effectively reduce the specific energy consumption of desalination to 1.1 kWh/m^3 and significantly reduce the OpEx of desalination.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/136743
Appears in Collections:Ph.D Theses (Open)

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