Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/135176
Title: ROLE OF THE PLA IN CHINA'S FOREIGN POLICY AND BEHAVIOR ABROAD
Authors: IAN BURNS MCCASLIN
Keywords: China, PLA, civil-military relations, professionalism, bifurcation
Issue Date: 19-Aug-2016
Citation: IAN BURNS MCCASLIN (2016-08-19). ROLE OF THE PLA IN CHINA'S FOREIGN POLICY AND BEHAVIOR ABROAD. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: The role of the PLA in China’s foreign policy and behavior abroad has evolved over time primarily due to professionalization of the PLA and the bifurcation of military and civilian members of the Chinese government. During the Korean War, due to the interconnected relationship between the PLA and CCP and the unprofessional nature of the PLA, the PLA was unable to effectively express its views and operate, in effect, the PLA had to operate as a subordinate actor even during war. By the time of the 1995-1996 Taiwan Strait Crisis, the PLA was sufficiently decoupled from the CCP to develop its own early distinct views and interests and operate as a pressure group within the government to influence the crisis. The bifurcation of the military and the civilian sides of government combined with the growing professionalism of the PLA have reached their zenith currently as seen with regard to the South China Sea. These two factors have allowed the PLA, with its own corporate views and interests to operate not only as a pressure group within the Chinese government, but to ally with individuals and organizations outside of the formal bodies government bodies it is in to influence China’s foreign policy and behavior abroad.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/135176
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