Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/133751
Title: Serial estimations of serum unconjugated estradiol 17β in high risk pregnancies
Authors: Dawood, M.Y.
Ratnam, S.S. 
Issue Date: 1974
Source: Dawood, M.Y., Ratnam, S.S. (1974). Serial estimations of serum unconjugated estradiol 17β in high risk pregnancies. Obstetrics and Gynecology 44 (2) : 200-207. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Serum unconjugated estradiol 17β (E2) was measured by a rapid radioimmunoassay method using a specific antibody. Serial estimations of serum E2 were performed in 10 pregnancies and 3 twin pregnancies complicated by hypertensive disorder of pregnancy, 2 cases of bad obstetric history, 8 cases of uncomplicated twin pregnancy, and 3 uncomplicated triplet pregnancies. Serum E2 was also measured in 7 instances of intrauterine death. In 2 of the 10 patients with hypertensive disorder of pregnancy resulting in delivery of dysmature, growth retarded babies, serial serum E2 showed a falling trend, with 2 or more successive values below the standard deviation range for normal pregnancy. A similar pattern was obtained in a case of bad obstetric history resulting in neonatal death of a dysmature, growth retarded infant. In all 3 cases, serum E2 was below 10 ng/ml. In 6 cases of intrauterine death due to placental dysfunction, serum E2 levels were low (between 0.375 and 6.46 ng/ml), while serum E2 was normal in 1 case of intrauterine death not due to placental dysfunction. Serum E2 was higher in uncomplicated twin and triplet pregnancies than in single pregnancies. The advantages and potential value of serum E2 measurement as an index of placental function are discussed.
Source Title: Obstetrics and Gynecology
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/133751
ISSN: 00297844
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

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