Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1080/00313029600169324
Title: The incidence of viremia and the heterogeneity of Hepatitis C virus genotypes among blood donors, hemophiliacs and patients with chronic liver disease
Authors: Kuperan, P.
Aw, T.C. 
Ishiko, H.
Hashimoto, O.
Takeda, N.
Keywords: Blood donors
Hemophilia
Hepatitis C virus
Polymerase chain reaction
Issue Date: 1996
Citation: Kuperan, P., Aw, T.C., Ishiko, H., Hashimoto, O., Takeda, N. (1996). The incidence of viremia and the heterogeneity of Hepatitis C virus genotypes among blood donors, hemophiliacs and patients with chronic liver disease. Pathology 28 (4) : 348-351. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1080/00313029600169324
Abstract: Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) is the major cause of parentally transmitted non-A, non-B hepatitis. We studied the incidence of HCV Viremia in blood donors, hemophiliacs and patients with chronic liver disease who are positive for antibodies to HCV, and then correlated the HCV genotypes among the three groups. 23 blood donors, 10 hemophiliacs and 97 patients with chronic liver disease were found to be positive for anti-HCV during this study period from June 1993 to December 1993. Only 3 (13%) blood donors, 6 (60%) hemophiliacs and 71 (73%) patients with chronic liver disease were found to be viremic when tested for HCV RNA by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The low incidence of viremia among blood donors may be due to any one of the following three reasons. 1, the level of viremia was below the level of detection. 2, the viremia was intermittent with persistent infection. 3, the majority of cases represented resolved infection. The HCV genotypes were heterogeneous among the three groups. All the blood donors with viremia and 35 (50%) of patients with chronic liver disease, belonged to type II (1b). However only one (17%) of the hemophiliacs belonged to type II (1b). Studies have shown that the genotype I (1a) is the predominant type in the USA and Europe, whereas type II (1b) is more frequent in the Far East. It is also suggested that type II (1b) is associated with non-responsiveness to interferon therapy. Our hemophiliacs were treated with imported coagulation factors, thus they were probably exposed to the genotypes in the west. There was significant difference in the incidence of HCV type II (1b) among local blood donors and hemophiliacs (P = 0.005). However the difference between the hemophiliacs and the patients with chronic liver disease was not statistically significant. The number of patients in this study was too small to draw any firm conclusions. However the findings highlight the importance of studying the genotypes of patients with Hepatitis C infection due to their relevance in the management of these cases with interferon therapy.
Source Title: Pathology
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/132045
ISSN: 00313025
DOI: 10.1080/00313029600169324
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