Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/131977
Title: Staphylococcus aureus CAPD-related infections are associated with nasal carriage.
Authors: Lye, W.C.
Leong, S.O.
van der Straaten, J.
Lee, E.J. 
Issue Date: 1994
Citation: Lye, W.C., Leong, S.O., van der Straaten, J., Lee, E.J. (1994). Staphylococcus aureus CAPD-related infections are associated with nasal carriage.. Advances in peritoneal dialysis. Conference on Peritoneal Dialysis 10 : 163-165. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage has been shown to be associated with an increased risk of S. aureus exit-site infections, but its association with peritonitis is less well established. We performed a four-year prospective study to determine the relationship between S. aureus continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD)-related infections and nasal carriage. All patients who had been started on CAPD from 1989 to 1992 had regular nose cultures. S. aureus nasal carriage was defined as two of three positive nose cultures. A total of 41 carriers and 105 noncarriers were studied. The rates of S. aureus exit-site infection (0.23 vs 0.09 episode/patient/year, p < 0.005), peritonitis (0.33 vs 0.10 episode/patient/year, p < 0.005), and catheter loss (0.12 vs 0.05, p < 0.01) were significantly higher among the carriers. Life-table analysis showed a significant risk of S. aureus exit-site infection and peritonitis for carriers (p < 0.01). Logistic regression analysis showed that S. aureus nasal carriage was the most important predictive factor for S. aureus peritonitis. In conclusion, our study showed that S. aureus nasal carriage is related to an increased incidence of S. aureus CAPD-related infections.
Source Title: Advances in peritoneal dialysis. Conference on Peritoneal Dialysis
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/131977
ISSN: 11978554
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

Show full item record
Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.

Page view(s)

8
checked on Dec 14, 2018

Google ScholarTM

Check


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.