Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/131837
Title: Tussive effect of a fentanyl bolus
Authors: Phua, W.T.
Teh, B.T.
Jong, W.
Lee, T.L. 
Tweed, W.A. 
Keywords: Analgesics
Cough
Fentanyl
Issue Date: 1991
Source: Phua, W.T., Teh, B.T., Jong, W., Lee, T.L., Tweed, W.A. (1991). Tussive effect of a fentanyl bolus. Canadian Journal of Anaesthesia 38 (3) : 330-334. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of pre-induction coughing, after an iv bolus of fentanyl. The study sample was 250 ASA physical status I-II patients, scheduled for various elective surgical procedures. The first 100 were randomly allocated to receive 1.5 μg·kg -1 fentanyl via a peripheral venous cannula (Group 1), or an equivalent volume of saline (Group 2). Twenty-eight per cent of patients who received fentanyl, but none given saline, coughed within one minute (P < 0.0001). The second 150 patients were then randomly assigned to three equal pretreatment groups. Group 3 received 0.01 mg·kg -1 atropine iv one minute before fentanyl. Groups 4 and 5 received 0.2 mg·kg -1 morphine im, and 7.5 mg midazolam po, respectively, one hour before fentanyl. Thirty per cent of patients in Group 3, 6% in Group 4, and 40% in Group 5, had a cough response to fentanyl. Fentanyl, when given through a peripheral cannula, provoked cough in a considerable proportion of patients. This was not altered by premedication with atropine or midazolam, but was reduced after morphine (P < 0.01). Coughing upon induction of anaesthesia is undesirable in some patients, and stimulation of cough by fentanyl in unpremedicated patients may be of clinical importance.
Source Title: Canadian Journal of Anaesthesia
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/131837
ISSN: 0832610X
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

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