Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/129285
Title: Evaluation of inhalational anaesthetics on murine in vitro fertilization
Authors: Lee, E.J.E.
Bongso, A. 
Kumar, A. 
Keywords: halothane
isoflurane
mouse oocytes
nitrous oxide
Issue Date: 1994
Citation: Lee, E.J.E.,Bongso, A.,Kumar, A. (1994). Evaluation of inhalational anaesthetics on murine in vitro fertilization. Annals of the Academy of Medicine Singapore 23 (4) : 479-485. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Chronic exposure to inhalational anaesthetics has been implicated in producing adverse reproductive effects in exposed personnel. A longer duration of general anaesthesia during laparoscopic oocyte retrieval for human in vitro fertilization programmes was associated with a decrease in fertilization and cleavage rates. In this study, a mouse model was used to evaluate the effects of clinical concentrations of nitrous oxide, isoflurane and halothane on in vitro fertilization. Mouse oocytes were exposed to 3 inhalational anaesthetic mixtures, oxygen/nitrous oxide, oxygen/nitrous/isoflurane 0.5% or oxygen/nitrous oxide/halothane 0.5% just prior to insemination and their subsequent development was assessed. The fertilization (2-cell) rate and early embryonic growth rate, i.e., 4-cell and morula rates were not statistically different from those of controls which were exposed to air. This study showed that short exposures to clinical concentrations of nitrous oxide, isoflurane and halothane had no deleterious effect on in vitro fertilization and early embryonic growth up to the morula stage in the mouse. Their effects on subsequent implantation and foetal teratogenecity are unknown.
Source Title: Annals of the Academy of Medicine Singapore
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/129285
ISSN: 03044602
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

Show full item record
Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.

Page view(s)

20
checked on May 31, 2018

Google ScholarTM

Check


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.