Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/129151
Title: HIERARCHICALLY POROUS SILICATE MATERIALS FOR CATALYTIC APPLICATIONS
Authors: SHENG YUAN
Keywords: nanomaterials, silicate, hierarchical structure, porous materials, transition metal, CO2 hydrogenation
Issue Date: 8-Jun-2016
Source: SHENG YUAN (2016-06-08). HIERARCHICALLY POROUS SILICATE MATERIALS FOR CATALYTIC APPLICATIONS. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: In recent years, materials with complex nanostructures have drawn increasing attention for their highly integrated functionality. Particularly, hierarchically porous nanomaterials have promising applications in catalysis, but their synthesis remains challenging. Herein, novel hierarchically porous silicate materials were developed for applications in catalytic CO2 hydrogenation. The thesis consists of four works which focus on single-walled 3d transition metal silicate nanotube assemblages, monodisperse macro-meso-microporous aluminosilicate spheres, hierarchical EMT-type zeolite, and integrated nanocatalysts with ZSM-5 cores and mesoporous Cu/Zn silicate shells, respectively. The materials were synthesized through hydrothermal and sol-gel processes involving soft-templated, hard-templated and/or template-free strategies for pore generation and morphological control. Extensive characterization was carried out using TEM, SEM, XRD, EDX, FTIR, NMR, ICP-OES, and N2 sorption techniques. In each work the materials were tested for their activity in methanol, dimethyl ether, carbon monoxide, or hydrocarbon synthesis from CO2/H2. Practical potentials and limitations of the materials were then evaluated
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/129151
Appears in Collections:Ph.D Theses (Open)

Show full item record
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormatAccess SettingsVersion 
ShengY.pdf73.59 MBAdobe PDF

OPEN

NoneView/Download

Page view(s)

41
checked on Jan 12, 2018

Download(s)

28
checked on Jan 12, 2018

Google ScholarTM

Check


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.