Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1136/annrheumdis-2012-202481
Title: Using lifestyle factors to identify individuals at higher risk of inflammatory polyarthritis (results from the European Prospective Investigation of Cancer-Norfolk and the Norfolk Arthritis Register-the EPIC-2-NOAR Study)
Authors: Lahiri, M. 
Luben, R.N.
Morgan, C.
Bunn, D.K.
Marshall, T.
Lunt, M.
Verstappen, S.M.M.
Symmons, D.P.M.
Khaw, K.-T.
Wareham, N.
Bruce, I.N.
Issue Date: Jan-2014
Citation: Lahiri, M., Luben, R.N., Morgan, C., Bunn, D.K., Marshall, T., Lunt, M., Verstappen, S.M.M., Symmons, D.P.M., Khaw, K.-T., Wareham, N., Bruce, I.N. (2014-01). Using lifestyle factors to identify individuals at higher risk of inflammatory polyarthritis (results from the European Prospective Investigation of Cancer-Norfolk and the Norfolk Arthritis Register-the EPIC-2-NOAR Study). Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases 73 (1) : 219-226. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1136/annrheumdis-2012-202481
Abstract: Objectives To investigate the association of lifestyle factors with risk of inflammatory polyarthritis (IP) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods The European Prospective Investigation of Cancer, Norfolk, UK (EPIC-Norfolk) gathered lifestyle data from participants aged 40-79 years from 1993 to 1997. Individuals who subsequently developed IP were identified by linkage with the Norfolk Arthritis Register. A Cox proportional hazard model was developed, and a score assigned to each risk factor to calculate the odds of developing IP. Results 25 455 EPIC participants were followed for a median (IQR) of 14.2 (12.9, 15.3) years; 184 developed incident IP (138 cumulatively fulfilled criteria for RA; 107 were seropositive). Pack-years of smoking were associated with increased risk of IP and RA in men (HR 1.21 (95% CI 1.08 to 1.37) per 10-pack-years) and seropositive IP (HR 1.24 (95% CI 1.10 to 1.41)) for all. Diabetes mellitus was associated with increased risk of IP (HR 2.54 (95% CI 1.26 to 5.09)), while alcohol (HR 0.86 (95% CI 0.74 to 0.99) per unit/day) and higher social class (HR 0.36 (95% CI 0.15 to 0.89) for professionals vs manual workers) were associated with reduced risk. Body mass index was associated with seronegative IP (HR 2.75 (95% CI 1.39 to 5.46) for obese vs normal-weight participants). In women, parity (HR 2.81 (95% CI 1.37 to 5.76) for ≥2 vs no children) was associated with increased risk, and breast feeding (HR 0.66 (95% CI 0.46 to 0.94) for every 52 weeks of breast feeding) was inversely associated with risk. Risk factors from the model were used to generate a 'risk score'. A total of 1159 (8.4%) women had scores reflecting a >3-fold increased risk of IP over those with a score of 0. Conclusions Several easily ascertained clinical and lifestyle factors can be used to stratify populations for risk of IP.
Source Title: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/128960
ISSN: 00034967
DOI: 10.1136/annrheumdis-2012-202481
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