Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11673-012-9392-9
Title: Buddhism and Medical Futility
Authors: Chan, T.W. 
DESLEY GAIL HEGNEY 
Keywords: Buddhism
Death
Health professionals
Medical futility
The mind
Issue Date: Dec-2012
Citation: Chan, T.W., DESLEY GAIL HEGNEY (2012-12). Buddhism and Medical Futility. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (4) : 433-438. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11673-012-9392-9
Abstract: Religious faith and medicine combine harmoniously in Buddhist views, each in its own way helping Buddhists enjoy a more fruitful existence. Health care providers need to understand the spiritual needs of patients in order to provide better care, especially for the terminally ill. Using a recently reported case to guide the reader, this paper examines the issue of medical futility from a Buddhist perspective. Important concepts discussed include compassion, suffering, and the significance of the mind. Compassion from a health professional is essential, and if medical treatment can decrease suffering without altering the clarity of the mind, then a treatment should not be considered futile. Suffering from illness and death, moreover, is considered by Buddhists a normal part of life and is ever-changing. Sickness, old age, birth, and death are integral parts of human life. Suffering is experienced due to the lack of a harmonious state of body, speech, and mind. Buddhists do not believe that the mind is located in the brain, and, for Buddhists, there are ways suffering can be overcome through the control of one's mind. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
Source Title: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/128567
ISSN: 11767529
DOI: 10.1007/s11673-012-9392-9
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

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