Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.112.000298
Title: Prognostic value of the Index of Microcirculatory Resistance measured after primary percutaneous coronary intervention
Authors: Fearon, W.F.
Low, A.F. 
Yong, A.S.
McGeoch, R.
Berry, C.
Shah, M.G.
Ho, M.Y.
Kim, H.-S.
Loh, J.P.
Oldroyd, K.G.
Keywords: Microcirculation
Myocardial infarction
Physiology
Issue Date: 18-Jun-2013
Citation: Fearon, W.F., Low, A.F., Yong, A.S., McGeoch, R., Berry, C., Shah, M.G., Ho, M.Y., Kim, H.-S., Loh, J.P., Oldroyd, K.G. (2013-06-18). Prognostic value of the Index of Microcirculatory Resistance measured after primary percutaneous coronary intervention. Circulation 127 (24) : 2436-2441. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.112.000298
Abstract: Background: Most methods for assessing microvascular function are not readily available in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. The aim of this study is to determine whether the Index of Microcirculatory Resistance (IMR), measured at the time of primary percutaneous coronary intervention, is predictive of death and rehospitalization for heart failure. Methods and Results: IMR was measured immediately after primary percutaneous coronary intervention in 253 patients from 3 institutions with the use of a pressure-temperature sensor wire. The primary end point was the rate of death or rehospitalization for heart failure. The prognostic value of IMR was compared with coronary flow reserve, TIMI myocardial perfusion grade, and clinical variables. The mean IMR was 40.3±32.5. Patients with an IMR >40 had a higher rate of the primary end point at 1 year than patients with an IMR ≥40 (17.1% versus 6.6%; P=0.027). During a median follow-up period of 2.8 years, 13.8% experienced the primary end point and 4.3% died. An IMR >40 was associated with an increased risk of death or rehospitalization for heart failure (hazard ratio [HR], 2.1; P=0.034) and of death alone (HR, 3.95; P=0.028). On multivariable analysis, independent predictors of death or rehospitalization for heart failure included IMR >40 (HR, 2.2; P=0.026), fractional flow reserve ≤0.8 (HR, 3.24; P=0.008), and diabetes mellitus (HR, 4.4; P40 was the only independent predictor of death alone (HR, 4.3; P=0.02). Conclusions: An elevated IMR at the time of primary percutaneous coronary intervention predicts poor long-term outcomes. © 2013 American Heart Association, Inc.
Source Title: Circulation
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/126841
ISSN: 00097322
DOI: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.112.000298
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