Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1093/ntr/ntr187
Title: Differential subjective responsiveness to a future cigarette price increase among South Korean youth smokers
Authors: Do, Y.K. 
Farooqui, M.A. 
Issue Date: 2012
Citation: Do, Y.K., Farooqui, M.A. (2012). Differential subjective responsiveness to a future cigarette price increase among South Korean youth smokers. Nicotine and Tobacco Research 14 (2) : 209-216. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1093/ntr/ntr187
Abstract: Introduction: While higher sensitivity to tobacco price increases among younger smokers as a group has been well recognized, little information is available on heterogeneity among youth smokers. This study examined differential responsiveness to an unspecified future cigarette price increase by smoking rate. Methods: This study used a subsample of 6,187 current youth smokers derived from the 2007 Korea Youth Health Survey, an annually repeated cross-sectional survey designed to monitor adolescent health behaviors in a large nationally representative sample of middle-school and high-school students in South Korea (N = 74,698). A generalized ordered logit model was estimated to examine independent associations of self-reported responses to an unspecified future cigarette price increase with smoking rate and time since smoking initiation, after controlling for other individual and family characteristics. Results: Higher smoking rates and longer time since smoking initiation were associated with a greater likelihood to continue smoking despite a future cigarette price increase. When these two factors were accounted for in the model, other individual characteristics were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Among youth smokers in South Korea, higher smoking rates were associated with lower self-reported responsiveness to a future cigarette price increase. Tobacco tax increases help prevent youth smokers from progressing to advanced stages of smoking, while certain subgroups of youth smokers, especially with nicotine dependence, may still need other effective cessation interventions. © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved.
Source Title: Nicotine and Tobacco Research
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/126479
ISSN: 14622203
DOI: 10.1093/ntr/ntr187
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