Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1177/0898264311408417
Title: Gender differentials in disability and mortality transitions: The case of older adults in Japan
Authors: Chan, A. 
Zimmer, Z.
Saito, Y.
Keywords: active life expectancy
disability
elderly
gender
Japan
Issue Date: Dec-2011
Citation: Chan, A., Zimmer, Z., Saito, Y. (2011-12). Gender differentials in disability and mortality transitions: The case of older adults in Japan. Journal of Aging and Health 23 (8) : 1285-1308. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1177/0898264311408417
Abstract: Objective: This study has two aims: (a) to examine gender differentials in disability transitions and active life expectancies among older adults in Japan and (b) to determine whether these gender differentials vary by age, socioeconomic characteristics, and disease profile. Method: Active and inactive states are defined as living with and without disabilities using activities of daily living. Expected years of life and active life are examined by constructing multistate life-tables, which employ probabilities of health and mortality transitions derived from hazard models. Results: Results indicate that older women in Japan live longer than older men and spend a proportion of these extra years with and without disability. Discussion: The discussion highlights a projected increase in the number of years that individuals, in particular women, will need long-term care. Policy implications include the need to bolster long-term care services in Japan. © 2011 SAGE Publications.
Source Title: Journal of Aging and Health
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/124585
ISSN: 08982643
DOI: 10.1177/0898264311408417
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