Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10826-014-9949-9
Title: Parental Influences on Pathological Symptoms of Video-Gaming Among Children and Adolescents: A Prospective Study
Authors: Choo, H. 
Sim, T.
Liau, A.K.F.
Gentile, D.A.
Khoo, A.
Keywords: Parent-child closeness
Parental restriction
Pathological video-gaming
Singapore
Video-gaming addiction
Issue Date: 23-Mar-2014
Citation: Choo, H., Sim, T., Liau, A.K.F., Gentile, D.A., Khoo, A. (2014-03-23). Parental Influences on Pathological Symptoms of Video-Gaming Among Children and Adolescents: A Prospective Study. Journal of Child and Family Studies. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10826-014-9949-9
Abstract: Although empirical studies and media reports have suggested that a number of children and adolescents play video-gaming excessively, resulting in pathological symptoms of video-gaming, longitudinal research on parental predictors of pathological symptoms of video-gaming is inadequate. By analyzing two-wave longitudinal data from 2,974 primary and secondary school students in Singapore, we examined the main effects of parent-child closeness and parental restriction of child video-gaming on children and adolescents' pathological symptoms of video-gaming over time and five interaction terms, namely parental restriction of child video-gaming by parent-child closeness, parent-child closeness by gender, parental restriction of child video-gaming by gender, parent-child closeness by age, and parental restriction of child video-gaming by age. Analyses of random intercept models and hierarchical multiple regression models consistently revealed that higher parent-child closeness at Wave 1 had a significant main effect on the decreased number of pathological symptoms at Wave 2 while parental restriction of child video-gaming at Wave 1 had no main effect, and that the effect of parent-child closeness was significantly stronger for boys than for girls. These results imply that restrictive rules and regulations set by parents on the child's video-gaming behaviors may not be an effective way of reducing the pathological symptoms of video-gaming. Instead, they highlight the importance of the parent-child bond and possible gender differences in this predictor in assessment and preventive measures for children and adolescents presenting pathological symptoms of video-gaming. © 2014 Springer Science+Business Media New York.
Source Title: Journal of Child and Family Studies
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/124542
ISSN: 10621024
DOI: 10.1007/s10826-014-9949-9
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