Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.3758/s13421-013-0305-x
Title: Recognition memory for foreign language lexical stress
Authors: Suárez, L.
Goh, W.D. 
Keywords: Auditory word recognition
Bilingualism
Language acquisition
Lexical stress
Psycholinguistics
Issue Date: 2013
Citation: Suárez, L., Goh, W.D. (2013). Recognition memory for foreign language lexical stress. Memory and Cognition 41 (6) : 872-885. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.3758/s13421-013-0305-x
Abstract: This study investigated whether English speakers retained the lexical stress patterns of newly learned Spanish words. Participants studied spoken Spanish words (e.g., DUcha [shower], ciuDAD [city]; stressed syllables in capital letters) and subsequently performed a recognition task, in which studied words were presented with the same lexical stress pattern (DUcha) or the opposite lexical stress pattern (CIUdad). Participants were able to discriminate same- from opposite-stress words, indicating that lexical stress was encoded and used in the recognition process. Word-form similarity to English also influenced outcomes, with Spanish cognate words and words with trochaic stress (MANgo) being recognized more often and more quickly than Spanish cognate words with iambic stress (soLAR) and noncognates. The results suggest that while segmental and suprasegmental features of the native language influence foreign word recognition, foreign lexical stress patterns are encoded and not discarded in memory. © 2013 Psychonomic Society, Inc.
Source Title: Memory and Cognition
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/124485
ISSN: 0090502X
DOI: 10.3758/s13421-013-0305-x
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