Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/120468
Title: MALE-SPECIFIC TRIACYLGLYCERIDES (TAGS), AN OVERLOOKED CLASS OF PHEROMONES, IN DESERT-ADAPTED DROSOPHILA: STRUCTURES, BEHAVIOURAL SIGNIFICANCE, AND CANDIDATE BIOSYNTHETIC GENES
Authors: JACQUELINE CHIN SIEW ROONG
Keywords: drosophila, mass spectrometry, pheromones, behaviour, triacylglycerides
Issue Date: 8-Jan-2015
Citation: JACQUELINE CHIN SIEW ROONG (2015-01-08). MALE-SPECIFIC TRIACYLGLYCERIDES (TAGS), AN OVERLOOKED CLASS OF PHEROMONES, IN DESERT-ADAPTED DROSOPHILA: STRUCTURES, BEHAVIOURAL SIGNIFICANCE, AND CANDIDATE BIOSYNTHETIC GENES. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: SEX-SPECIFIC TRIACYLCLYERIDES (TAGS) ARE BROADLY CONSERVED ACROSS THE SUBGENUS DROSOPHILA, AND NOT SOPHOPHORA, IN AT LEAST 11 SPECIES AND REPRESENT A NOVEL CLASS OF PHEROMONES THAT HAS BEEN LARGELY OVERLOOKED. TAGS ARE SECRETED EXCLUSIVELY BY MALES FROM THE EJACULATORY BULB, AND TRANSFERRED TO FEMALES DURING MATING. USING VARIOUS MASS SPECTROMETRY METHODS, THE STRUCTURES AND NATURAL ISOMERS OF THE TAGS WERE ELUCIDATED TO REVEAL AN UNUSUAL STRUCTURAL MOTIF THAT HAS NOT BEEN REPORTED BEFORE IN OTHER NATURAL PRODUCTS. BEHAVIOURAL ASSAYS DEMONSTRATED THAT IN AT LEAST TWO DESERT DROSOPHILID SPECIES, THE TAGS FUNCTION SYNERGISTICALLY TO INHIBIT COURTSHIP FROM MALES, AND SYNTHESIZED UNNATURAL TAG ISOMERS COULD ALSO ELICIT THE COURTSHIP AVOIDANCE EFFECT. RNA-SEQ ANALYSIS COMPARING MATURE AND IMMATURE EJACULATORY BULBS OF D. ARIZONAE AND D. MOJAVENSIS REVEALED A LARGE NUMBER OF HIGHLY UPREGULATED GENES THAT HAVE NO OBVIOUS ORTHOLOGS TO D. MELANOGASTER, SUGGESTING THESE GENES TO BE CANDIDATE NOV
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/120468
Appears in Collections:Ph.D Theses (Open)

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