Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/116629
Title: The Drosophila bifocal gene encodes a novel protein which colocalizes with actin and is necessary for photoreceptor morphogenesis
Authors: Bahri, S.M. 
Yang, X. 
Chia, W. 
Issue Date: Sep-1997
Source: Bahri, S.M.,Yang, X.,Chia, W. (1997-09). The Drosophila bifocal gene encodes a novel protein which colocalizes with actin and is necessary for photoreceptor morphogenesis. Molecular and Cellular Biology 17 (9) : 5521-5529. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Photoreceptor cells of the Drosophila compound eye begin to develop specialized membrane foldings at the apical surface in midpupation. The microvillar structure ultimately forms the rhabdomere, an actin-rich light- gathering organelle with a characteristic shape and morphology. In a P- element transposition screen, we isolated mutations in a gene, bifocal (bif), which is required for the development of normal rhabdomeres. The morphological defects seen in bif mutant animals, in which the distinct contact domains established by the newly formed rhabdomeres are abnormal, first become apparent during midpupal development. The later defects seen in the mutant adult R cells are more dramatic, with the rhabdomeres enlarged, elongated, and frequently split. bif encodes a novel putative protein of 1063 amino acids which is expressed in the embryo and the larval eye imaginal disc in a pattern identical to that of F actin. During pupal development, Bif localizes to the base of the filamentous actin associated with the forming rhabdomeres along one side of the differentiating R cells. On the basis of its subcellular localization and loss-of-function phenotype, we discuss possible roles of Bif in photoreceptor morphogenesis.
Source Title: Molecular and Cellular Biology
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/116629
ISSN: 02707306
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

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