Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/113245
Title: The SPOROCYTELESS gene of Arabidopsis is required for initiation of sporogenesis and encodes a novel nuclear protein
Authors: Yang, W.-C.
Ye, D.
Xu, J. 
Sundaresan, V.
Keywords: Arabidopsis mutant
Nuclear protein
SPL
Sporocyte
Sporogenesis
Issue Date: 15-Aug-1999
Citation: Yang, W.-C.,Ye, D.,Xu, J.,Sundaresan, V. (1999-08-15). The SPOROCYTELESS gene of Arabidopsis is required for initiation of sporogenesis and encodes a novel nuclear protein. Genes and Development 13 (16) : 2108-2117. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: The formation of haploid spores marks the initiation of the gametophytic phase of the life cycle of all vascular plants ranging from ferns to angiosperms. In angiosperms, this process is initiated by the differentiation of a subset of floral cells into sporocytes, which then undergo meiotic divisions to form microspores and megaspores. Currently, there is little information available regarding the genes and proteins that regulate this key step in plant reproduction. We report here the identification of a mutation, SPOROCYTELESS (SPL), which blocks sporocyte formation in Arabidopsis thaliana. Analysis of the SPL mutation suggests that development of the anther walls and the taperum and microsporocyte formation are tightly coupled, and that nucellar development may be dependent on megasporocyte formation. Molecular cloning of the SPL gene showed that it encodes a novel nuclear protein related to MADS box transcription factors and that it is expressed during microsporogenesis and megasporogenesis. These data suggest that the SPL gene product is a transcriptional regulator of sporocyte development in Arabidopsis.
Source Title: Genes and Development
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/113245
ISSN: 08909369
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

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