Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/113215
Title: AFP+, ESC-derived cells engraft and differentiate into hepatocytes in vivo
Authors: Yin, Y.
Yew, K.L.
Salto-Tellez, M.
Ng, S.C.
Lin, C.-S.
Lim, S.-K. 
Keywords: Alpha-fetoprotein
Embryoid bodies
Embryonic stem cells
Green fluorescent protein
Hepatocytes
Issue Date: 2002
Source: Yin, Y.,Yew, K.L.,Salto-Tellez, M.,Ng, S.C.,Lin, C.-S.,Lim, S.-K. (2002). AFP+, ESC-derived cells engraft and differentiate into hepatocytes in vivo. Stem Cells 20 (4) : 338-346. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: A major problem in gene therapy and tissue replacement is accessibility of tissue-specific stem cells. One solution is to isolate tissue-specific stem cells from differentiating embryonic stem (ES) cells. Here, we show that liver progenitor cells can be purified from differentiated ES cells using alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) as a marker. By knocking the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene into the AFP locus of ES cells and differentiating the modified ES cells in vitro, a subpopulation of GFP+ and AFP-expressing cells was generated. When transplanted into partially hepatectomized lacZ-positive ROSA26 mice, GFP+ cells engrafted and differentiated into lacZ-negative and albumin-positive hepatocytes. Differentiation into hepatocytes also occurred after transplantation of GFP+ cells in apolipoprotein-E-(ApoE) or haptoglobin-deficient mice as demonstrated by the presence of ApoE-positive hepatocytes and ApoE mRNA in the liver of ApoE-deficient mice or by haptoglobin in the serum and haptoglobin mRNA in the liver of haptoglobin-deficient mice. This study describes the first isolation of ES-cell-derived liver progenitor cells that are viable mediators of liver-specific functions in vivo.
Source Title: Stem Cells
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/113215
ISSN: 10665099
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

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