Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.112.048603
Title: Caffeinated and caffeine-free beverages and risk of type 2 diabetes
Authors: Bhupathiraju, S.N.
Pan, A.
Malik, V.S.
Manson, J.E.
Willett, W.C.
Van Dam, R.M. 
Hu, F.B.
Issue Date: 1-Jan-2013
Citation: Bhupathiraju, S.N., Pan, A., Malik, V.S., Manson, J.E., Willett, W.C., Van Dam, R.M., Hu, F.B. (2013-01-01). Caffeinated and caffeine-free beverages and risk of type 2 diabetes. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 97 (1) : 155-166. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.112.048603
Abstract: Background: Consumption of caffeinated beverages such as coffee and tea has been associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Paradoxically, short-term metabolic studies have shown that caffeine impairs postprandial glycemic control. Objective: The objective was to prospectively examine the association of caffeinated compared with caffeine-free beverages, including coffee, tea, sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs), and carbonated artificially sweetened beverages (ASBs), with T2D risk. Design: We prospectively observed 74,749 women from the Nurses' Health Study (NHS, 1984-2008) and 39,059 men from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (HPFS, 1986-2008) who were free of diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer at baseline. Results: We documented 7370 incident cases of T2D during 24 y of follow-up in the NHS and 2865 new cases during 22 y of follow-up in the HPFS. After major lifestyle and dietary risk factors were controlled for, caffeinated and caffeine-free SSB intake was significantly associated with a higher risk of T2D in the NHS (RR per serving: 13% for caffeinated SSBs, 11% for caffeine-free SSBs; P < 0.05) and in the HPFS (RR per serving: 16% for caffeinated SSBs, 23% for caffeine-free SSBs; P < 0.01). Only caffeine-free ASB intake in NHS participants was associated with a higher risk of T2D (RR: 6% per serving; P < 0.001). Conversely, the consumption of caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee was associated with a lower risk of T2D [RR per serving: 8% for both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee in the NHS (P < 0.0001) and 4% for caffeinated and 7% for decaffeinated coffee in the HPFS (P < 0.01)]. Only caffeinated tea was associated with a lower T2D risk among NHS participants (RR per serving: 5%; P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Irrespective of the caffeine content, SSB intake was associated with a higher risk of T2D, and coffee intake was associated with a lower risk of T2D. © 2013 American Society for Nutrition.
Source Title: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/108886
ISSN: 00029165
DOI: 10.3945/ajcn.112.048603
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