Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2288-11-141
Title: Validity of the international physical activity questionnaire and the Singapore prospective study program physical activity questionnaire in a multiethnic urban Asian population
Authors: Nang, E.E.K. 
Gitau Ngunjiri, S.A.
Wu, Y. 
Salim, A. 
Tai, E.S.
Lee, J. 
Van Dam, R.M. 
Issue Date: 2011
Citation: Nang, E.E.K., Gitau Ngunjiri, S.A., Wu, Y., Salim, A., Tai, E.S., Lee, J., Van Dam, R.M. (2011). Validity of the international physical activity questionnaire and the Singapore prospective study program physical activity questionnaire in a multiethnic urban Asian population. BMC Medical Research Methodology 11 : -. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2288-11-141
Abstract: Background: Physical activity patterns of a population remain mostly assessed by the questionnaires. However, few physical activity questionnaires have been validated in Asian populations. We previously utilized a combination of different questionnaires to assess leisure time, transportation, occupational and household physical activity in the Singapore Prospective Study Program (SP2). The International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) has been developed for a similar purpose. In this study, we compared estimates from these two questionnaires with an objective measure of physical activity in a multi-ethnic Asian population. Methods. Physical activity was measured in 152 Chinese, Malay and Asian Indian adults using an accelerometer over five consecutive days, including a weekend. Participants completed both the physical activity questionnaire in SP2 (SP2PAQ) and IPAQ long form. 43subjects underwent a second set of measurements on average 6 months later to assess reproducibility of the questionnaires and the accelerometer measurements. Spearman correlations were used to evaluate validity and reproducibility and correlations for validity were corrected for within-person variation of accelerometer measurements. Agreement between the questionnaires and the accelerometer measurements was also evaluated using Bland Altman plots. Results: The corrected correlation with accelerometer estimates of energy expenditure from physical activity was better for the SP2PAQ (vigorous activity: r = 0.73; moderate activity: r = 0.27) than for the IPAQ (vigorous activity: r = 0.31; moderate activity: r = 0.15). For moderate activity, the corrected correlation between SP2PAQ and the accelerometer was higher for Chinese (r = 0.38) and Malays (r = 0.57) than for Indians (r = -0.09). Both questionnaires overestimated energy expenditure from physical activity to a greater extent at higher levels of physical activity than at lower levels of physical activity. The reproducibility for moderate activity (accelerometer: r = 0.68; IPAQ: r = 0.58; SP2PAQ: r = 0.55) and vigorous activity (accelerometer: 0.52; IPAQ: r = 0.38; SP2PAQ: r = 0.75) was moderate to high for all instruments. Conclusion: The agreement between IPAQ and accelerometer measurements of energy expenditure from physical activity was poor in our Asian study population. The SP2PAQ showed good validity and reproducibility for vigorous activity, but performed less well for moderate activity particularly in Indians. Further effort is needed to develop questionnaires that better capture moderate activity in Asian populations. © 2011 Khaing Nang et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
Source Title: BMC Medical Research Methodology
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/108596
ISSN: 14712288
DOI: 10.1186/1471-2288-11-141
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

Show full item record
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormatAccess SettingsVersion 
2011-Validity_International_Physical_Activity_Questionnaire-published.pdf317.4 kBAdobe PDF

OPEN

PublishedView/Download

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

23
checked on Jul 13, 2018

WEB OF SCIENCETM
Citations

20
checked on Jun 12, 2018

Page view(s)

69
checked on Jul 6, 2018

Download(s)

28
checked on Jul 6, 2018

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.