Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwn281
Title: Sleep duration and coronary heart disease mortality among Chinese adults in Singapore: A population-based cohort study
Authors: Shankar, A.
Koh, W.-P. 
Yuan, J.-M.
Lee, H.-P. 
Yu, M.C.
Keywords: Asian continental ancestry group
Cardiovascular diseases
Coronary disease
Mortality
Singapore
Sleep
Issue Date: Dec-2008
Citation: Shankar, A., Koh, W.-P., Yuan, J.-M., Lee, H.-P., Yu, M.C. (2008-12). Sleep duration and coronary heart disease mortality among Chinese adults in Singapore: A population-based cohort study. American Journal of Epidemiology 168 (12) : 1367-1373. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwn281
Abstract: While some studies have found a positive association between both short and long sleep durations and cardiovascular disease (CVD), others have found an association only with a long or short sleep duration. In addition, there are limited data from non-Western populations on this topic. The authors examined the association between sleep duration and coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality among Chinese adults in Singapore (1993-2006), performing a prospective cohort study among 58,044 participants aged ≥45 years (55.9% women) without preexisting CVD. The main outcome of interest was CHD mortality (n = 1,416). The authors found both short and long sleep durations to be positively associated with CHD mortality, independent of smoking, alcohol intake, and body mass index. Compared with persons with a sleep duration of 7 hours (referent), the multivariable relative risk of CHD mortality for a sleep duration of ≤5 hours was 1.57 (95% confidence interval: 1.32, 1.88); for a sleep duration of ≥9 hours, it was 1.79 (95% confidence interval: 1.48, 2.17). This association persisted in subgroup analyses by sex and body mass index. In a population-based cohort of Chinese adults from Singapore, sleep durations of ≤5 hours and ≥9 hours (versus 7 hours) were modestly associated with CHD mortality. These results suggest that sleep duration may be an important marker for CVD. © The Author 2008. Published by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved.
Source Title: American Journal of Epidemiology
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/108546
ISSN: 00029262
DOI: 10.1093/aje/kwn281
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