Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/107546
Title: Minimal change nephrotic syndrome - A complex genetic disorder
Authors: Gong, W.K. 
Chng, W.
Yap, H.-K. 
Keywords: Angiotensin converting enzyme gene
Cytokines
Flt-1
Gene polymorphism
Human leukocyte antigen
Issue Date: 2000
Source: Gong, W.K.,Chng, W.,Yap, H.-K. (2000). Minimal change nephrotic syndrome - A complex genetic disorder. Annals of the Academy of Medicine Singapore 29 (3) : 351-356. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Introduction: Minimal change nephrotic syndrome (MCNS) is the most common primary nephrotic syndrome in childhood. While the pathogenesis of this disease is still unknown, there is considerable evidence that it is an immune disease. This role of genetic susceptibility in this disease is the subject of this review. Methods: Reported studies addressing potential genetic factors in MCNS were reviewed. These factors included human leukocyte antigen (HLA) associations, genes involved in the renin-angiotensin system and cytokines. Results: Several authors have reported the presence of familial clustering, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) associations, and association with asthma and atopy, suggesting a genetic susceptibility to the disease. Moreover, recent studies on the role of the renin angiotensin system, cytokines and their respective receptors on the severity and clinical course of the disease, have lent further support to the immunogenetic basis of this disease. Conclusion: Knowledge of the genetic basis of MCNS may have important therapeutic implications in this disease, in particular, the role of cytokines and their respective receptors, including the influence of environmental factors on their expression.
Source Title: Annals of the Academy of Medicine Singapore
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/107546
ISSN: 03044602
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

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