Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11095-006-9783-x
Title: Use of in vitro critical inhibitory concentration, a novel approach to predict in vivo synergistic bactericidal effect of combined amikacin and piperacillin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a systemic rat infection model
Authors: Chan, E. 
Zhou, S. 
Srikumar, S.
Duan, W.
Keywords: Amikacin-piperacillin combination
Concentration ratio
In vitro critical inhibitory concentration
In vivo bactericidal synergism
Pharmacokinetic- pharmacodynamic relationship
Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection
Issue Date: Apr-2006
Citation: Chan, E., Zhou, S., Srikumar, S., Duan, W. (2006-04). Use of in vitro critical inhibitory concentration, a novel approach to predict in vivo synergistic bactericidal effect of combined amikacin and piperacillin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a systemic rat infection model. Pharmaceutical Research 23 (4) : 729-741. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11095-006-9783-x
Abstract: Purpose. This study was undertaken to explore the use of in vitro critical inhibitory concentration (CIC) as a surrogate marker relating the pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters to in vivo bactericidal synergistic effect [pharmacodynamic (PD)] of amikacin + piperacillin combination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a systemic rat infection model. Methods. The in vitro antibacterial activities of amikacin and piperacillin, alone and in combinations at various ratios of the concentrations, were tested against a standard [5 × 105 colony-forming units (CFU)/ml] and a large (1.5 × 108 CFU/ml) inoculum of P. aeruginosa ATCC 9027 using a modified survival-time method. The CIC of each individual antibiotic for the different combinations was determined using a cup-plate method. In vivo studies were performed on Sprague-Dawley rats using a systemic model of infection with P. aeruginosa ATCC 9027. PK profiles and in vivo killing effects of the combination at different dosing ratios were studied. Results. An inoculum effect was observed with the antibiotics studied. Synergy was seen against both the inocula at the following concentration ratios: 70% C ami + 30% C pip and 75% C ami + 25% C pip, where C ami and C pip are the concentrations of amikacin and piperacillin to produce a 1000-fold decrease in bacterial population over 5 h, respectively. The CIC values determined corroborated with the order of in vitro bacterial killing observed for the antibiotic combinations. The dosing ratio of 12.6 mg/kg amikacin + 36 mg/kg piperacillin (a 70:30 ratio of the individual doses) exhibited the greatest killing in vivo when compared to the other ratios. The PK-PD relationships were described by simple, linear regression equations using the area under the in vivo killing curve as a PD marker and the AUCIC ami/CICami + AUCICpip/CICpip, AUCami/CICami + AUCpip/CICpip, Cmax,ami/CICami + Cmax,pip/CICpip, and AUCICami/MICami + AUCICpip/MIC pip as PK markers for the amikacin + piperacillin combination. Conclusion. The combination of amikacin and piperacillin exhibited synergistic killing effect on P. aeruginosa that could be modeled using CIC as a surrogate marker relating the PK parameters to in vivo bactericidal effect. © 2006 Springer Science + Business Media, Inc.
Source Title: Pharmaceutical Research
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/106495
ISSN: 07248741
DOI: 10.1007/s11095-006-9783-x
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