Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1105845108
Title: Temporary increase in plasma membrane tension coordinates the activation of exocytosis and contraction during cell spreading
Authors: Gauthier, N.C.
Fardin, M.A.
Roca-Cusachs, P.
Sheetz, M.P. 
Issue Date: 30-Aug-2011
Citation: Gauthier, N.C., Fardin, M.A., Roca-Cusachs, P., Sheetz, M.P. (2011-08-30). Temporary increase in plasma membrane tension coordinates the activation of exocytosis and contraction during cell spreading. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 108 (35) : 14467-14472. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1105845108
Abstract: Cell migration and spreading involve the coordination of membrane trafficking, actomyosin contraction, and modifications to plasma membrane tension and area. The biochemical or biophysical basis for this coordination is however unknown. In this study, we show that during cell spreading, lamellipodia protrusion flattens plasma membrane folds and blebs and, once the plasma membrane area is depleted, there is a temporary increase in membrane tension by over twofold that is followed by activation of exocytosis and myosin contraction. Further, an artificial increase in plasma membrane tension stopped lamellipodia protrusion and activated an exocytotic burst. Subsequent decrease in tension restored spreading with activation of contraction. Conversely, blebbistatin inhibition of actomyosin contraction resulted in an even greater increase in plasma membrane tension and exocytosis activation. This spatiotemporal synchronization indicates that membrane tension is the signal that coordinates membrane trafficking, actomyosin contraction, and plasma membrane area change. We suggest that cells use plasma membrane tension as a global physical parameter to control cell motility.
Source Title: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/101840
ISSN: 00278424
DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1105845108
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