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Title: Free amino acids and energy metabolism in eggs and larvae of sea bass, Lates calcarifer
Authors: Sivaloganathan, B. 
Walford, J. 
Ip, Y.K. 
Lam, T.J. 
Issue Date: Jul-1998
Source: Sivaloganathan, B., Walford, J., Ip, Y.K., Lam, T.J. (1998-07). Free amino acids and energy metabolism in eggs and larvae of sea bass, Lates calcarifer. Marine Biology 131 (4) : 695-702. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Contents of free amino acids (FAA), protein and ammonium ions together with rates of ammonia excretion and oxygen consumption were measured in order to study the role of FAA as an energy substrate in developing eggs and larvae of seabass (Lates calcarifer) maintained in seawater (30 ppt) at 28°C without feeding. Initially eggs contained 25.3 nmol ind-1 of FAA of which 21.5 nmol was rapidly utilised by the developing eggs and larvae during the period up to 40 h post spawning (PS) when nearly all the yolk had been resorbed. During the same period, a net increase in protein content of 1.7 μg ind-1 was observed, indicating that the major part of the amino acids lost from the free pool had been polymerised into body proteins. Assuming that the balance of the FAA after protein synthesis was used entirely for energy metabolism, FAA appeared to be an important energy substrate during the embryonic stages (2 to 16 h PS); after hatching, the contribution of FAA to energy metabolism was less significant. From 50 h PS until the end of the study period at 100 h PS, amino acids derived from somatic protein were used for energy metabolism. For the overall period from just after spawning up to 100 h PS, the data indicate that ca. 14% of the total aerobic energy metabolism was derived from amino acid catabolism.
Source Title: Marine Biology
ISSN: 00253162
DOI: 10.1007/s002270050361
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

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