Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1080/10715760902801533
Title: Dopamine (DA) induced irreversible proteasome inhibition via DA derived quinones
Authors: Zhou, Z.D. 
Lim, T.M. 
Keywords: Aminochrome
Dopamine
GSH
H2O2
Parkinson's disease
Proteasome inhibition
Issue Date: 2009
Citation: Zhou, Z.D., Lim, T.M. (2009). Dopamine (DA) induced irreversible proteasome inhibition via DA derived quinones. Free Radical Research 43 (4) : 417-430. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1080/10715760902801533
Abstract: This study demonstrated that DA and its oxidative metabolites: H2O2 and aminochrome (AM), cyclized DA quinones, could all directly inhibit proteasome activity. DA and AM, especially AM, could induce intensive and irreversible proteasome inhibition, whereas proteasome inhibition induced by H2O2 was weaker and GSH reversible. It was concluded that DA induced irreversible proteasome inhibition via DA-derived quinones, rather than through small molecular weight ROS. The AM was also more toxic than H2 O2 to dopaminergic MN9D cells. Furthermore the cytotoxicity and proteasome inhibition induced by DA, AM and H2 O2 could be abrogated by GSH, ascorbic acid (AA), Vitamin E, SOD (superoxidase dismutase) or CAT (catalase) with different profiles. Only GSH was potent to abrogate DA, AM or H2O2 -induced cell toxicity and proteasome inhibition, as well as to reverse H2O2-induced proteosome inhibition. Therefore, therapeutic strategies to increase GSH level or to use GSH substitutes should function to control PD onset and development.
Source Title: Free Radical Research
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/100500
ISSN: 10715762
DOI: 10.1080/10715760902801533
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